Northern Winter Beaches, Changes and Playtimeu

[THIS was in my drafts folder. SERIOUSLY? It was the last time we travelled, actually. And here, sheltered-at-home, crocuses and daffodils are starting to pop up. Where HAS my mind been lately? I’m sure you all can guess. So stay home. Stay safe. Love to you.]

Friday. Jeff’s day off. Sunny day. Off to South Haven and Van Buren State Park on Michigan’s western coast. A very favorite place of ours in all seasons, especially not in busy summer – when it is crowded with people, dogs, and bugs. We went to three beaches: the state park, and South Haven’s south beach and north beach.

It was briskly-cold. City temp was 30 degrees with a wind chill of 17. But there on the beaches, the wind roars mightier, and the temperature is colder yet. After only a few minutes of photographing waves, my iPhone simply shut down. It couldn’t stand the cold. So I stuck it in my jean’s pocket to warm up. Have you ever held a baggie of ice in your pocket? Similar feeling. Makes your eyes go cross.

The water level is high, with some docks in the channel marinas being washed over with incoming surges. (Earlier I also posted about the high water level four hours north of us in Leelanau County, at Fishtown. I wonder if the high water is also happening across the pond in Wisconsin?)

But with all the changes, and a day off now and again with cooperating weather, we still love to play outside (Jeff skipped ice on the lake.) We hiked the narrowing beaches, listened to the lapping waves, and talked to hungry gulls…well, I talked, anyway.

Jeff skipped flat ice vs rocks.

The splashing waves onto the pier rails seemed nature-artsy. There were a number of other people out and about taking photos, including a man in waders on the south beach.

img_2443

 Besides the seasonal variations, our western coast has changed over the past couple of years. For example, Van Buren State Park beach has vanished, due to high water and erosion. Part of me wants to say how awful this is; another part knows this is nature.

A Before Shot of the beach, which doesn’t even show the end of the sidewalk; and a couple taken this weekend, showing how the sand is eroding underneath the sidewalk’s end.

DSC08730

 

img_2228

Michigan’s shoreline has Critical Dunes. That means they move – with the wind, with the snow, with the rain. Here is a favorite little building of ours, taken in both summer, and this past winter weekend. Seems like this particular critical dune is moving in on the outhouse, soon to make it a buried house. Bye-bye, sweet little, dependable house.

 

img_7717

Life is full of changes. A dramatic one for us is happening this year as we move this fall to the other side of Lake Michigan. That will be a big change with plenty of unknowns, but will also carry with it family, exciting new adventures, and more places to explore.

Book Giveaways of The Powder Horn of Mackinac Island

It’s officially summertime! That means time for summer reading, especially on those days you can’t get outside to play.

Below are four opportunities to win a copy of The Powder Horn of Mackinac Island by Sandy Carlson. {humbly bowing} The book is set on the Michigan tourist location of Mackinac Island, where no motorized vehicles are allowed.

Short synopsis: Arianna just finished 7th grade and has to go to Mackinac Island for the summer with her parents and paraplegic brother to earn money for his upcoming surgery. By way of their inherited powder horn, she discovers she can time travel to 1793. But so can her brother. Only there, in the past, Luc can walk and run, and doesn’t want to return to the uncertain present.

The Powder Horn of Mackinac Island was published in March, and leveled at U by F&P Guided Reading. If you win and live in the USA, you will receive a print copy. If you win and live outside of the USA, you get an ebook copy. Good luck to all, and happy reading!

First Chance: Tracey A. Wood’s Blog this week only: Tracey’s Blog

Second Chance: Comment on my (this) blog post below between June 25 and July 6, 2017 for one winner.

Third chance: Goodreads Giveaway, June 28 – July 6, 2017.

The Powder Horn of Mackinac Island by Sandy Carlson

or Goodreads Giveaway

Fourth chance: Go to the book’s new FaceBook page and like and comment between June 25 and July 6, 2017: FaceBook Book Page to The Powder Horn of Mackinac Island

Fifth…anytime opportunity: And in case you can’t wait for a giveaway, or just missed getting one, you can find The Powder Horn of Mackinac Island in print or ebook at:

 

And FINALLY (if you made it this far), if you want to take a look at some photos of Mackinac Island, check out my Pinterest page: Pinterest – Mackinac Island Favorites

 

Another Print Book v.s. eBook Shocker — and eBookstores in Airports

A year ago I’d talked at length to a book buyer for three bookstores in the Detroit Airport. He was actually very excited and gave me much promise particularly since he loved my genre (historical fiction). But because in my excitement I had no contact information except his name, I waited for my next flight out of Detroit this past weekend in order to drop off one of my books for him to preview. To my shock, the bookstore was gone. I asked one of the workers across the hallway what had happened. She informed me that the two bookstores in that terminal had changed over to sports stores last spring or summer. The Wall Street Journal was the only store now carrying books, and that was only if the author was on the best seller list. This kind clerk actually called the buyer from a year ago, who said he remembered me, apologized, and regretfully told me that books don’t sell. I thanked him, signed the copy of my book, and gave it away to the helpful clerk who apparently does read books, and was very excited about her gift.

I then went to the gate area to await the arrival of my plane, brooding on the sad state of economy where bookstores no longer existed. I felt like I was cast into some bookless utopian society I’d read about as a youth. When I pulled out of my depression, I looked around at my fellow waiting passengers. Out of about two hundred seated people, six slept, three read books or a magazine, and everyone else was on an electronic device. Everyone. Else.

So how are we to adapt to this shocking realization? (Granted, people were playing eGames as well as reading, but some people were reading!)

I was thinking there ought to be eBookstores in airports with QR tags along a wall, which could easily be both categorized by age and genre as well as rotated. The eBookstore would then get part of the profits for selling the books. All it would take is a scan from an electronic device and a “clerk” who would change the tags every week or every other week.

BRILLIANT, SANDY! SIMPLY BRILLIANT!

And finny-dib-dibs on the idea! I figure that for coming up with this sensational original idea, I would have my book covers and QR tags displayed in airports on a rotating basis, or maybe a 0.01% for every book sold this way.

Raise your eHand if you think this is also a brilliant idea.

(BTW, on my trip I read from both print books and ebooks. And on another-yet-similar note, about twenty-five years ago I came up with the idea of hand-held computers. At least I wrote about them in my novel. Seriously. Wouldn’t that be cool? Oh. Right. People have already invented that now. Sigh.)