Being Your Own IT

I like to write. However, I do not like technology. My husband tells me I was born in the wrong century. But for dentistry and doctors, the thought of living in a past century makes me grin. I prefer bartering over exchange of money. I prefer walking over any type of transportation. I prefer telling stories to people face-to-face instead of over distance or shot out into the electronic ether. I do like personal first class, snail mail, postal letters, both sending and receiving, even though that’s another distance thing, but it’s a personal distance thing. Then there’s the medical side of previous centuries (for the negative), but the technology (for the positive).

I may not like technology, but can accept it is great, as long as it is clear how it works, does what you expect it to do, and doesn’t change. All three of those examples are what give me this tentative and shaky relationship with technology. Social media is necessary in today’s author’s world, but if technology changes (which is its nature), you must constantly be updating and changing yourself as well. And to market and promote, again, technology is essential.

With the changes and all the technical parts of technology, at times I falter if my little old brain can handle it all by being my own IT person. Other days it all seems so simple. Lately I haven’t been able to post because (near as I can make out), my browser cashe was full, but then I woke this morning to be my own IT guy and fix it, and — surprise! — I can post. Miracles, I can handle. Changes or errors in technology, not so much.

So if you want to be your own IT, you can. You’re smart. You adapt well to changes. You happily spend hours searching to find out how to find the answer to fix things.

TMM — Too Much Musing

Multi-tasking – Writing in Two Genres

Hi. My name is Sandy Carlson. I write historical fiction for kids.

Hi. My name is S. L. Carlson. I write YA fantasy. 

On Saturday, I’m doing a book signing at the Maritime Museum in South Haven, MI. Even though  my next unicorn book is coming out this fall and I must work on promotions for that, the story doesn’t take place on the sea. On Saturday I’ll be signing my ghost stories historical fiction, Tales of the Lost Schooner. Yes, that’s a sea tale; hence, the Maritime Museum. 

As I wrote in my last post, I need to focus. So I will only work on one project at a time. But after the manuscript is “done” and sitting with one of the editors, I tend to become antsy during the wait. I feel the need to remain focused on that one project and keep my mind clear for it. So instead of writing, I’ll engage in other creative activities during the wait.

I know other writers advise to work on your next writing project. Used to. Not recently. I may do some marketing, but I not only want my mind free during this waiting period, I also need to be creatively thinking and doing. This summer I’ve been crafting miniatures.

While my husband was sick, I spent a lot of time sitting with him. I kept my mind writing-free, but my hands busy making miniatures: 1:60 scale Dungeons and Dragons tiles, furniture, etc (for Arizona son); 1:87 scale HO railroad tunnels, buildings, and scenery (for husband); and a miniature house and furnishing (for my other son and grandkids). For myself, I’ve been toying with ideas of crafting miniatures of scenes from my books.

Let the creative juices flow. 

Long, Long, Sickness July

CD5A39D0-4017-4B3F-B041-B7DA09D0029BI admire those writers who can write through it all. Not me. I need to focus. So I’ve been focusing on my sick husband who seems to be doing his best to baffle the many doctors he’s seen. It’s more difficult since we both have been rather healthy and active all our lives. Yes, we’ve been sick for a week with flu or colds, but being ill for over six weeks has been different, and rather distracting. Last month was horribly long

Now there may be some light at the end of this tunnel. I’m thinking of not just doing the bit-promoting of my published books, but starting the writing of the next. This is huge to this writer.

I can’t write through it all, but I can return to my passion without feeling like I’d left it more than a few days. 

Keep on writing. 

 

Cruise Cancellation Giveaway

Checklist for tomorrow’s cruise to Alaska: passports copied, cash, gift bags for pilots and crew, travel-sized stuff bought along with new underwear, start packing suitcase… all checked off and more.

Then…yesterday we had to cancel the trip because of medical issues. Rethink the week. Husband, heal. Me, giveaway stuff.

Checklist for next week’s Cruise Cancellation Giveaway! Start a new fantasy blog for my BWL published stories. Check. (Work in progress).

So go to: https://authorslcarlson.wordpress.com and like and follow for a chance to win books or school or library visits, and even a critique. Double your chances by sharing (and sending me the link).

Anchors away for a July giveaway!

Old Dog; New Tricks; Any time Surprises

Kent District Library puts on writers conferences in Grand Rapids. I attended once before, spoke on marketing another time, and decided to go again this spring. Realizing the conference is mostly for newbie writers, and having nine books published, I wasn’t sure what I would get out of it. Then came the emails of the waiting list, and to let them know if we were unable to attend. I thought to give up my spot, but something compelled me to go, not for what I could get out of it, but what I could give to others.

The physical conference set-up was different from my other times. Attendees sat around tables, six per table. I sat with six strangers. Previously, we were packed in rows, where I only socialized with the persons on my right or left, and everyone was on their own for lunch. This time, all morning and during the provided lunch we six were able to get to know each other. One had never heard of critique groups. Connections and invites were made. Towards the end of lunch I finally confessed that I was published, but…and then I rambled a bit about the confusion between author Sandy Carlson (for my MG historical fictions) and author S. L. Carlson (for my YA fantasies). I gave them each my business card (I was the only one with any), but warned them my website needed some serious updating. From their feedback, I realized I ought to set up a separate website for S. L. Carlson. It meant additional research and work, but what an unexpected epiphany… coming from newbies! This old dog learned new tricks from young pups. I thank you! Woof.

The breakout session on podcasting was eye-opening-new to me as well. Yet another reason to attend writers conferences: to keep updated on the industry’s technology.

Keep on writing. Keep on learning. Woof-woof!

 

First Whole Novel Revision

Did it. I finished writing my next book in the War Unicorn series, standing now at 64K. The writing was a long and hard part. My relief is sweet, but short. Now onto the next hard(er) part (whole novel revision) before more revisions and sending off to my first editor for even more revisions.

Most of my chapters have already sailed through my critique group. They are a remarkable group. I find it amusing how one can spot things the others don’t, and that’s true for each person. I love my critiquers!

For this first whole novel revision, I’m basically using Darcy Pattison’s book Novel Metamorphosis. It’s meant as a workbook. The spine glue on my copy is coming apart even though the only writing in it is Darcy’s signing on the title page. The book is well-worn because I’ve used it for nearly every one of my manuscripts. This particular book is a bit more complicated than my others, so I needed wider eyes to evaluate it.

I just finished my Connotation Worksheet, found on page 69 of her book, but expanded it. In order see my characters more clearly, I adapted her basic form to my own categories. I have many characters. By doing this, I am able to see where to strengthen the individual’s relationship to his various aspects. These are some of my categories across the top of my page:

CHARACTER    FAV FOOD   SECRET   AFRAID OF   ANTAGONIST   MAIN GOAL/DESIRE

 Okay. Enough sharing with you all. Off to do more analyzing of my novel so I can revise better and delight you each with this book coming out in September. And here’s the cover reveal:

Carlson-WarUnicorn2Escape 4mb

Poetry and Me

I mentioned recently to my brother how a high school friend on FaceBook made a reference to a poem, and that I was quite surprised by how many of her FB friends worried about her v.s. recognizing the quote and the amusing application to her situation. We’d undoubtedly both memorized “Jabberwocky” because Dale and I grew up together, had many of the same teachers, and it’s such a fun and adventuresome poem which rolls around your tongue as you dramatically speak it aloud.

Back to the conversation with my brother. He, too, remembered how I loved to memorize poems. I grinned on my end of the phone, recalling in my mind snips of lengthy ballads by great poets. Then he started quoting one I used to say: “Once there was an elephant who tried to use a telephant…” — one I’d learned in second grade! That’s the poem my brother remembered I’d memorized.

Besides reading, speaking, and memorizing poems, there is also the writing end.

I’ve tried. I’ve tried writing poetry. I never feel good about the end results, and tuck them away in files either tossed or on computer disks I can’t even access any more. Even so, I take a stab at writing one or three now and again. They’re hard. They’re hard to write. They’re hard to critique. (Four just came through my critique group.)

Besides, I find poems to be rather subjective.

Back in South Dakota, a couple decades ago, I created three very different poems, different both in styles and themes. I gave all three to three teachers I worked with and asked their opinions of which they liked best. At the time, I wanted to try to focus my poetry writing. When they got back to me, each had chosen a different poem she really, really liked, and responded “eh” to the other two. It turned out my experiment was more about subjectivity than poetry style or theme.

I truly admire people who can write poetry. Truly. I just can’t do it myself. So, instead, I think I’ll go rummage through some of my dusty books and, alone in my house, dramatically read aloud a few choice favorites. Please feel free to do the same.

What I’ve Learned About Whole Book Writing – One, Two! One, Two!

Nearly everyone in the profession says to first get your story written – the rough draft bit. Only from that point can you see: 1) character development; 2) plot twists; and most importantly, 3) the big picture. Here, you might be like me, and after seeing all the holes and inconsistencies, you drop your head to the desk and never want to write another word, because calling what you spent months writing a rough draft is simply being polite. But you pick yourself up to see what can be done.

After the rough draft is completed, you start hacking away at it, cutting scenes and even chapters which don’t push the story or character development forward. I’ve even thrown away major characters because they were redundant or didn’t serve much purpose.

Then comes your rewrite.

Then comes revisions, lots of them.

Then comes letting your critique group read some. Although sometimes my dear critique group reads subs which I later eliminate, but that is because they only see slices at a time (1-3 chapters) v.s. the big picture (whole novel). They do, however, keep me writing and writing and writing, as well as continue being terrific friends.

Then come the editor’s comments to address.

Then comes the word-by-word read to make sure every single word is right, and not just spelled correctly. (And sometimes, you all still miss some.)

My next book, Escape: The War Unicorn Chronicles, Book 2, is scheduled for a September 2018 publication date. A month ago, I switched plans and decided to combine two books. Whatever was I thinking? Plus, I feel writing in two points of view is distracting, both for the writer and the reader, yet here I am, doing just that.

It was only after finishing the rough/rewritten/revised draft of one and starting on the next, that I realized the two needed to be mashed together. I’ve already cut out about 20,000 words from the second story, but need to now finish that rough draft  to another 20- 30,000 words, making sure they not only make sense as one story, but that they mash seamlessly together. I’m painfully deleting from that first story. Painfully, because I adore those scenes, those dialogues, those descriptions and interactions, but…“One, two! One, two! And through and through the vorpal blade went snicker-snack!”

So…1) finish your rough draft; 2) delete and add; 3) rewrite; 4) revise; 5) send through critique group; 6) revise; 7) send to editor; 8) revise; 9) do word-by-word check; 10) release your baby to the publisher.

 

What I’ve Learned Writing a Series

War Unicorn was published last fall with Books We Love. I loved (and hated) my characters enough to keep thinking about them, wanting to send them on more adventures. Hence: a series began.

I have two of five planned books in the series written, awaiting final editing and approval and release dates. I find the remaining three books harder and more complicated to write because of the additional people and places, but I must persevere.

What I’ve learned in writing a series:

1)      Characters – Keep the main characters consistent throughout; obviously, there will be additional characters thrown in the mix with each book, but keep your protagonist and main antagonist forefront;

2)      Plot – Not only does each individual story have its own arch with a satisfying endings, the entire series need to have an over-arching plot thread which makes sense; maps of the world, outlines of plots, family and other relationships trees also help here;

3)      Space your release dates (and therefore, finish writing each story) to keep your readers interested and not too far apart in time so they don’t forget who is who and what they want;

4)      Writing a series is a major commitment; if you begin one, don’t give up; set clear goals (if your editor doesn’t do it for you), and push through to see them accomplished.

5)      Keep on writing, and good luck to you.

Marketing and Promoting Your New Book

War Unicorn has been published with Books We Love Publishing, LLC.

Calrson-WarUnicorn-TheRing-150

So how do you go about marketing and promoting, especially if you (like me) had surgery immediately after it was published? There are several sit-down ways to start your promoting. Here are a few to consider with your own new release:

  1. Update your website to include cover photo, short synopsis, and links to buy the book.
  2. Tweet it, post the cover on Instagram, shout your hurray on Facebook, or any and every other social media platform on which you are involved.
  3. Consider doing a book launch, a blog tour, and/or a physical book-signing tour. (Requires about thirty times more contacts for every one interested party, as well as much planning.)
  4. Seek reviewers. (Reviews are an author’s golden treasure.)
  5. Start contacting libraries, schools, bookstores, etc. for signings or speaking engagements.
  6. Do giveaways on Amazon and Goodreads (or others) to stir interest in your book.
  7. Enter your book in contests – however, only those which you’ve researched and know are ligit.

And while you’re at it, why don’t you go check out this new and fabulous MG fantasy by S.L. Carlson:

WAR UNICORN Print: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1773627201/

WAR UNICORN Ebooks: http://books2read.com/u/3Ro6jp

And if you are so inclined, please leave a golden token (review on Amazon or Goodreads). Happy reading!