Your Writing Process – Revisions and/or Rewrites

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This morning I stared of out my work window at leaves sparkling in the sunshine in a light breeze. Then reality struck as I realized these are last fall’s brown oak leaves, clutching onto branches overhanging snow mounds, not-not-not giving way until the new leaves force them off next month. It made me think of my present WIP.

The story has been done for months. Then, as it sat while I was involved in other projects, I began to see ways to improve WIP Story, even wanting to delete it all and begin from page one on a blank screen.

This morning, it struck me that the old dried brown oak leaf represented my WIP Story. Then I went out and took a picture of the shivering old things. Realizing no one could see the shivering in a still photo (although I’ve inserted the shot), I took a video and panned up the tree. In my mindset, I was horrified to see ALL my WIPs fluttering before me. At least hundreds of my old ideas. Thousands.

Oh, spring, come quickly! I welcome fresh green ideas and stories.

(P.S. My original intent of this post was to ask what’s YOUR writing process – if you revise as you write, if you do multiple revisions, or if you go back to the beginning and rewrite?)

Reason # 6 for Self-Publishing — Acceptance in the Literary Community

Reason # 6 I have for deciding to self-publish is that there is more acceptance in the literary community today for self-publishing v.s. even two years ago. This change may have come about by best-selling authors stretching out their publishing muscles and self-publishing. Although I do know some best-selling authors who seriously need an editor (e.g., an editor friend informed me when her author decided to publish without her input and how bad it was written without her).

Then there are still the horrid writers and topics at which I cringe with self-published books, or have no story in their stories. But that is them. I am me. I strive to be the best author I can be, constantly learning and growing and changing and becoming better each year. Will you find errors or typos in my books. Absolutely not… well, maybe. But without a copy editor, I’m working on there being nothing which needs to be changed for my story to be a good story.

Would I go with a traditional editor/publisher? In a heartbeat. Well, in a heartbeat after making sure we are good fits for each other. I certainly would not jump at the first editor who mentioned the C word (contract), and know it would take another 2-4 years before I’d see the book in print. But to have my stories combed through by someone who does that for a living, yes, that would be lovely. It would be awesome to focus merely on writing and revisions instead of the other twelve jobs associated with self-publishing.

In the meantime, I’m thankful for the growing acceptance in the literary community for well-written self-published books.

How an Author Spends Editorial Time

A friend sent me a goofy picture with a confused look and asked if this is how authors feel about editorial time. I looked at it and thought: 1) I don’t feel confused, but rather, challenged. I pace in order to figure out difficult plot or character situations; and 2) Half of my editorial time is spent cleaning the house, doing yard work and laundry, reading and responding to emails and FaceBook posts. The other half of my editorial time is spent in no-blinking computer screen reading and re-reading and rewriting and revising until my legs go numb and my back feels like it’s had a rod stuck in it for days. Oh, and there’s the print-out version time when I think I’m ready for a final look-through, and end up putting editorial marks and revised words on each page until they’re nearly unreadable.

Maybe it’s not such a good idea for an author to work at home. Not this one, anyway. But since I find other locations very distracting, it’s the best I’ve got.

Lesson Plan for Organizing Your Plot Arch with a Plot Board

While working on a whole-novel revision this past week, I found I had a lot more organizing to do than when I started. I’d thought I was much farther along in the process. Even glancing over the whole, I realized my panster-vomited scenes and chapters, although with an okay beginning and an excellent ending and lots of good stuff in the middle, didn’t really have a flow or sensible plot arch. The story seemed nearly episodic, although I knew each scene was written for a reason. I’d previous cut out other chapters and scenes which were irrelevant to the overall plot, and knew there were places I needed to deeply revise, like changing the okay beginning to a can’t-wait-to-find-out-what-happens-next beginning. But for this part of revising, I needed to feel the overall flow worked.

In the back of my brain, I remembered something Friend Rose did with rearranging scenes. (Thanks, Rose.) If I remember right, she had post-it notes by chapters and scenes over her wall, and rearranged them as she thought of their logical placement. This she did with five children and all their friends running through the house. (Bless you, Rose.) So I adapted her idea into a lesson plan for organizing my middle grade plot arch on one sheet of paper. The former teacher in me continues to reign.

Materials Needed:

A first draft of a “completed” novel (digital or paper); List of main and minor plot threads; Table of Contents for your story; blank sheet of paper; pen; a second pen in case the first one runs out of ink; and thirty to fifty 1/2″ by 2″ post-it notes of yellow, green and blue. (The number of post-it notes needed will vary with each story.)

procedure:

1) Set aside your draft and list of plot threads to only use as references.

2) Lay your blank sheet of paper landscape way (or as they’d say in elementary schools, the hot dog way).

3) Write your title on the very top of your paper.

4) About 4/5 of the way down draw a line across the page. Beneath this line and writing from the left to the right, put your chronological times (e.g., if your story covers five months, write the five months across the page; if your story covers a few weeks, write the number of weeks). This is your Plot-working Board.

5) Turn small post-it’s sideways (hot-dog way) with sticky bottom on the left side down).

6) On the green post-its, write the settings or weather patterns found throughout in the story. Scatter beneath the chronological line in appropriate order in your story.

7) On the blue post-its, write each chapter title. Place titles in appropriate locations above each chronological indication.

8) On the yellow post-its, describe each scene in three or so words (e.g., Dylan tricks Kilee abt ride;  Shader confronts Mi Lin; Mom dies, etc.), and place beneath each chapter.

9) Cross your arms, sit back, stare at your pieced-together story. Are the plot threads sprinkled throughout? Should some scenes be switched? Do you see blanks in your plot? Are there Goals, Conflicts, and Disaster in each scene; and Reaction, dilemma, and Decision in each sequel?

10) During the next week, play with and rearrange your Plot Board. You may find you add new scenes to write, or crumble and throw away others. Keep rearranging until your plot makes the most sense possible.

11) Go back to your whole novel and update your Table of Contents, and reorder your scenes in your manuscript, and write any new ones.

12) Print out and do a quick read of the entire story, playing attention to plot arch and flow. If you’re satisfied, get others’ opinions (critique groups), revise again. Repeat  as often as necessary.

December 2011 Writing Challenge

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My NaNoWriMo Skeleton — after deleting junk and moving things like backstory, character interviews, etc. to other files — is sadly in need of carbs. Some scenes I thought I’d written were no more than scene plots. (Picture a “Home Alone” palms to face slap.) Then, this morning, after not thinking or writing on it for three whole days, a couple more scenes came to mind: carb scenes.

I usually do word-count challenges here, but after NaNoWriMo, I’m ready for a change. My writing goal for this month is to spend ten hours each week for the rest of December working on my WIP from WriMo: 40 hours of writing or revising to the end of the month. Simple, right? (Good thing the web cam isn’t on, or you’d see me chewing down my nails. Finding time for me to write in December is like trying to milk rocks. Sigh.) So…? Any takers?

How Do You Revise?

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An interesting question popped up on Miss Snark’s blog today: (basically) How do you revise? Do you revise right away or let it sit?

It got me thinking…

I revise in various ways:

1)sometimes as I’m writing the rough draft (a very slow writing method);

2) the following day, while reading over the previous few paragraphs or chapter to get a running start on new words;

3) when I’m finished with the entire rough draft for consistencies of voice, etc;

4) after going through comments from a few beta readers or critique group; and

5) right before I click “send” for an agent/editor submission. If it’s rejected, the story can sit years before I look at it again, then — BAM — it’s like I’m my own beta reader.

So? What about you? (Or are you like a best-selling author I know who says, “Only revise when your editor tells you to”?)

Simple Writing Rules

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Rule #1: Writing is not simple.

Rule #2: Write; Finish what you write; Revise; Have it critiqued; Revise a few more times; Let it sit.

Rule #3: Read. Read. Read — read EVERYTHING you can get your hands on: books in your field/genre; NF research; books for pleasure; books so out of whack from your own writing genre that it would make your fellow writers blink to see you reading them; etc., etc..

Rule #4: Take another look at your story; Revise again.

Rule #5: Research agents and/or editors; submit it.

Rule #6:  Start writing another story.

Rule #7: Go out and play. (More grown-up authors might rephrase that to “Go out and live.”)

Well?

Revisions!

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I am revising one of my stories now, and came to the conclusion that I find revisions both frustrating and wonderful. Frustrating, because I must find the time or force myself to sit down and DO them. Wonderful, because, my, what a better story I’ve written afterwards.

I have come to a second conclusion, that if I’m doing a whole-novel revision, I work best on hard copy. When I sit in front of a computer screen to do revisions, I don’t have the past scribbled pages next to me to show me how much progress I’ve made. On the computer screen, it all looks good, and so I plug away one line at a time without really seeing the progress. Doing whole novel revisions is similar to weeding a garden. If you just plucked five weeds daily, you may not notice much of a difference. But if you spend a couple of hours (or full day) weeding, and next to you is this pile of weeds to be tossed, there is greater satisfaction.

Keep writing, and keep revising! If you have only a few minutes a day to revise, keep plugging away. If you can read your hard-copy scribbles, keep doing those corrections. Which is your preference, or do you do revisions entirely different from these two?

The Amazingly Creative Darcy Pattison

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A little behind on my email catch-up, but too early for epiphany (January 6), I saw this writing reflective article by author-speaker Darcy Pattison, and absolutely had to share it. In it, she gives writing tips from the song, “We Three Kings.” She also lists other writing tips from other Christmas-y subjects. Amazing, fun, and creative woman!

http://www.darcypattison.com/revision/7-writing-tips-from-the-3-kings/

Pre-writing, Raw Writing, Revisions

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I’m working on a new story, started a couple months ago. It takes up a lot of my thought time. I’m rather anti-social right now, even when it comes to posting on my writing blog. It’s as though all these other things in life are merely interfering with what I am passionate about, and what I can’t stop thinking about. I’ve done pre-writing, outlining, know where the story is going. I’ve done some raw writing — love doing this rambling, care-free part of writing. And, because I have been submitting chapters to my critique group, I have also had to work on revisions. Sometimes I find that all three of these writing stages (pre-writing, raw writing, and revisions) go on interchangeably, like a wild writing dance. I just hang on to my partner (the story line); sometimes I lead, and sometimes the manuscript leads.

So now I’m at about 35,000 words, with some chapters merely book-marked with a paragraph telling what goes on there. If I were a more disciplined writer, or a writer without a critique group to hold me accountable each month, I think I’d write out the entire story in one shot. But then, perhaps I’m not that disciplined writer. So I pre-write, raw-write, then revise and re-write until the story is finished. Dry to talk about, but exciting to do. Off to write.